GOLDENDOODLES

WHAT IS A GOLDENDOODLE?

F1= Goldenretriever and Standard Poodle    F1B= Goldendoodle and Standard Poodle

History

The Goldendoodle is considered to be one of the newest of the “Doodle,” or poodle mix, breeds. Breeding began in the 1990s, after both the Cockapoo and the Labradoodle gained footholds. The theory behind the Goldendoodle’s development was to create a larger Doodle that maintained the desired low-dander, low-shedding coat and that possessed the intelligent and friendly nature of the Golden Retriever.

Size

The Golden doodle tends to come in three different sizes: Miniature, Small Standard, and Large Standard.The Miniature Golden doodle is the result of a Miniature or Toy poodle crossed with a golden retriever. These dogs tend to range in size from 13 to 20 inches in height and 15 to 35 pounds in weight.The average height for a Small Standard Golden doodle is 17 to 20 inches; the weight is 40 to 50 pounds.The Large Standard Golden doodle averages 20 to 24 inches in height and weighs 50 to 90 pounds.

Personality

The Goldendoodle has not become popular for lack of good reason. His positive personality traits are numerous — he endears himself to everyone he meets with his friendly, intelligent, accepting nature.Usually highly affectionate, he’s gentle and patient and makes a wonderful family companion, especially since he actively enjoys human company. He is loyal and, with proper training, can be highly obedient. He does have a playful side and can be mischievous if the mood hits. Temperament is affected by a number of factors, including heredity, training, and socialization. Puppies with nice temperaments are curious and playful, willing to approach people and be held by them. Choose the middle-of-the-road puppy, not the one who’s beating up his littermates or the one who’s hiding in the corner.

Health

Goldendoodles are generally healthy, but like all breeds, they’re prone to certain health conditions. Not all Goldendoodles will get any or all of these diseases, but it’s important to be aware of them if you’re considering this breed.

  • Patellar Luxation: Also known as slipped stifles, this is a common problem in small dogs. The patella is the kneecap. Luxation means dislocation of an anatomical part (as a bone at a joint). Patellar luxation is when the knee joint (often of a hind leg) slides in and out of place, causing pain. This can be crippling, although many dogs lead relatively normal lives with this condition.
  • Ear Infections: These can be a problem for Golden doodles because of their floppy ears, which trap moisture. Check and clean the ears regularly.
  • Hip Dysplasia: This is an inherited condition (though it’s also sometimes triggered by malnutrition) in which the thighbone doesn’t fit snugly into the hip joint. Some dogs show pain and lameness on one or both rear legs, but others don’t display outward signs of discomfort. (X-ray screening is the most certain way to diagnose the problem.) Either way, arthritis can develop as the dog ages. Dogs with hip dysplasia should not be bred — so if you’re buying a puppy, ask the breeder for proof that the parents have been tested for hip dysplasia and are free of problems.
  • Elbow Dysplasia: Similar to hip dysplasia, this condition is also a degenerative disease. It’s believed to be caused by abnormal growth and development, which results in a malformed and weakened joint. The disease varies in severity: the dog could simply develop arthritis, or he could become lame. Treatment includes surgery, weight management, medical management, and anti-inflammatory medication.
  • Care

The Goldendoodle can be easy to train. Intelligent, he’s usually eager to please — a perfect combination for either first-time trainers or experienced trainers. He should be trained with positive reinforcement, since harsh corrections could damage his confidence. Socialization is important for all breeds, but for a gentle dog like the Goldendoodle it can be instrumental in discouraging any shyness or timidity. The Goldendoodle has an average energy level and will require daily exercise through walks or a good romp in the back yard. Generally speaking, 20 to 30 minutes of daily exercise will be enough to keep a Goldendoodle from becoming bored. He’s known for his love of water, so swimming provides another opportunity for appropriate exercise.

Feeding

Recommended daily amount: 1 to 4 cups (depending on adult size) of high-quality dry food a day, divided into multiple meals. NOTE: How much your adult dog eats depends on his size, age, build, metabolism, and activity level. Dogs are individuals, just like people, and they don’t all need the same amount of food. It almost goes without saying that a highly active dog will need more than a couch potato dog. The quality of dog food you buy also makes a difference — the better the dog food, the further it will go toward nourishing your dog and the less of it you’ll need to shake into your dog’s bowl.

here are some pictures of our previous golden retrievers as well as some of our previous litters.  we currently don’t have any puppies available however you may still find the puppy you are looking for with our partner bellanottepuppiesga.com